Decarbonising Major Industry Sectors

Power Generation

EU Directive driving for a 10% to 20% mix of hydrogen with natural gas for gas turbine power generation and other large power consumers.

Process Industry

All major process industries using SMR (Steam Methane Reforming) hydrogen today will transition to green hydrogen using electrolyser technologies producing H2 at cost parity.

Mobility

EU Directive in conjunction with continuously rising CO2 tax will drive for a shift to green fuels followed by a technology shift away from combustion.

Buildings

Self-sustainability of buildings will be the final goal, supported by all available technologies for green power and heat generation and storage.

Hydrogen Strategies – The Market Drivers

With Hydrogen policies approved for Europe, Germany, Portugal and Spain, Hydrogen Ventures can deliver an aggregated hydrogen solution for local authorities and industries.

Hydrogen policies approved for Europe, Germany, Portugal and Spain.

EU
Directive
for the
Hydrogen Sector

EU Member States promoting their own Country Policies for Hydrogen Usage

C

Hydrogen Ventures can deliver an aggregated hydrogen solution for local authorities and industries.

EU DIRECTIVE OBLIGES

A 10% to 20% H2 mix into gas pipes.

 

GOVERNMENT POLICIES

Commitment to help transition to green economy and geo-political supply chain security.

 

OIL MAJORS

Now looking for renewable assets to produce green H2.

 

EARLY-MOVER ADVANTAGE

Having secured business model.

 

SUBSTANTIAL PROJECTS PIPELINE

Established companies.
Government driven.
Shovel ready projects.
Secured venues.

 

PROFESSIONAL DEDICATED TEAM

The Transition From Grey To Green Hydrogen

Market Size For Green Hydrogen In Europe

Estimating UK Carbon Values Beyond 2050

DECC* has recently adopted a new target-consistent approach to value carbon savings to 2050. The new methodology sets the valuation of carbon at a level that is consistent with the UK Government’s domestic and international targets in the short and long term. This new methodology has replaced the previous approach based on damage cost estimates.

“… In the short term (up to 2030), different targets in the Traded (ETS) and Non Traded (non–ETS) sectors imply that emissions in the two sectors are essentially different commodities and the approach to valuing carbon needs to reflect this reality.
…..
Beyond 2030, a fully working global carbon market is assumed implying a single carbon value for economic appraisal over the 2031-2050 period that reflects the costs required to achieve the EU long term target of limiting dangerous climate change to 2 degree centigrade …. “

* DECC presently designated as BEIS
Source: DECC Department of Energy & Climate Change; https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/48108/1_20100120165619_e____carbonvaluesbeyond2050.pdf